January 28, 2013

Some More Anchor Charts

My newest obsession: Anchor Charts!  Why?  Because they're SUPER helpful to me during my guided reading lessons.  I am constantly referring to my anchor charts while I'm introducing and discussing text, and I'm starting to see more and more of my guided reading students refer to them when they respond to discussion points.  Here are a few of my newest anchor charts that I refer to during guided reading:

This one is all about fluency.  During a reading intervention that I conducted today, I actually referred one of my students to this chart, and we talked about what fluent readers do.  He actually had never realized that readers should self-correct.  He thought that if you re-read and repeat yourself that you actually are making more errors.  We talked about the importance of rereading to self-correct so that the reader is making sense of what the text is saying.  I just found that conversation really interesting, and it's something that I'm going to continue to bring up to my other guided reading groups.


Many students don't realize the different demands that are being placed on themselves, as readers, as they read different genres.  Understanding the demands different genres place on them helps students identify what they should do to form meaning from the text.  The anchor charts above remind students of SOME of the different types of thinking they can engage in while reading fiction and non-fiction.

One common question I ask my guided reading groups is, "How does the author's decision on what point of view to use affect you as a reader."  It always initiates a strong conversation that allows students to critique the author's decisions surrounding point of view positively or negatively depending on their preference.  Getting students to understand the different points of view in literature and how to identify them allows students to more easily access the text based on the type of information they will be able to expect from the narrator.

Bring it on, guided reading! ;)

Kasey


6 comments :

  1. I am curious. Do you have your students write down this information in their "notes"? I use the interactive notebooks and I struggle with how much to have them write down and how much just to have as anchor charts around the room. Any words of wisdom?

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    1. I'm not sure how different the Reader's and Writer's notebooks that I use are from your Interactive Notebooks, but I'm assuming they're pretty similar. I am in the middle school setting, so I do expect my students to write down the minilesson statement each day for Reader's and Writer's Workshop. I also have them take any notes that are relevant to what we're doing in class for that day pertaining to that minilesson. So I guess I would say that if it pertains to the minilesson for that day, and I think it would help them in the future, I would encourage them to write it down. However, I wouldn't want to do this every day because students would get burnt out. Also, I sometimes encourage students to either write down what they think will be helpful to them and/or write it down in their own words.

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  2. I'm going to 7th grade and I actually find this very helpful

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  3. I teach 5th grade in Atlantic City and we began guided reading and writers workshop ten years ago. I like seeing your anchor charts. It neat to see what other people write.

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    1. It's always fun for me to see the anchor charts that my co-workers come up with and that I see on Pinterest. It's definitely the best way to come up with new ideas! :)

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