September 23, 2014

Six Tips for Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI) Organization

Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI) is that perfect intervention for students in your school who are reading below grade level.  At my middle school, we've implemented a 35 minute intervention period at the beginning of our school day where EVERY student at our school receives math or reading intervention/instruction/extension.  Our philosophy is that every student can become a better reader, writer, and mathematician.  One intervention tool that has been instrumental in allowing us to implement our ILA period is LLI.

We have twelve Language Arts teachers, a reading interventionist, and myself (a literacy coach) who are trained in implementing the intervention.  Since this period happens at the same time, it is essential that the LLI resources be organized and are ready to use by multiple people at the same time.  Our elementary literacy coach taught us an awesome trip at the middle school for organizing LLI systems, and we were blessed to have awesome parent volunteers come in to make the organization come to life.  Check out the pictures and tips below for ideas in organizing LLI systems at your school.



Tip #1:  Use file cabinets to store the lessons.  This will make the lessons accessible to teachers, and really makes it easier to help maintain and organize the LLI resource.  As you can also see, each file drawer is labeled with the color of the system and the lesson range of the lessons contained in that drawer.


Tip #2: Use file folders to label and house the books and lessons.  Each lesson has its own hanging file folder.  Inside that folder is the lesson, the books for that lesson, and any handouts from the online resources that coordinate to the lesson.


Tip #3:  Photocopy the lesson and all of the handouts from the online resources needed for that particular lesson.  Tell teachers to make any copies they need and leave the originals in the folder as the master.  This keeps everything for each lesson together and allows all of our teachers who need the resource at the same time of day to have access to what they need for each lesson.

Tip #4:  We currently use the Red and Gold LLI Systems at our school, and the handout pictured above is a quick reference chart for teachers to be able to check where levels begin and end within each of the systems.  Once teachers have their benchmark data on their LLI students, this chart gives them a quick idea of where to start.

Tip #5: We have norms for LLI material use.  It is a valuable resource to us, and if it is not maintained, there is not money to simply buy another system.  Teachers who use LLI as a resource for providing intervention follow these norms so that it continues to be a great resource.

Tip #6:  Each file cabinet has a sign out sheet for teachers to check-out the lessons they take.  This once again maintains the resource and allows teachers to ask each other for lessons they may need when the lesson is not available in the file drawer.

At the middle school, we are anxiously awaiting the arrival of the Purple LLI System, which will target students reading at levels R-W.  These levels will be ideal for interventions targeting our 6, 7, and 8 students population reading below grade level.


Hope everyone is having an enjoyable school year!  Can't wait to hear from you as our years get rolling! :)

18 comments :

  1. Kasey,
    Is this research based? I want to get our district to do this, but they will only go for programs that are researched based. So right now we are doing corrective reading. UGH!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It totally depends who you ask. I know a lot of districts use LLI as the first intervention and then if it's not effective go to a more focused intervention from there. Interventions are such an interesting topic in the state of Wisconsin right now with what "counts" and what doesn't.

      Delete
  2. This year at the school where I teach, we have implemented a 45 minute block of time at the beginning of each day for intervention but we call it Enrichment not intervention. The whole school is involved and each teacher has between 8 and 10 students who are on the same reading level (this is based on several sources of data). We used leveled readers,concept readers (ELL & ELD) and guided reading materials as well as extension materials. I think its very effective to be able to work with a small group & really focus on their needs. They are hearing the same vocabulary and the reading skill for each week is reinforced throughout the day which allows students to make connections.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are absolutely right! Your school is very lucky to have enough staff to group students in this way. I, too, teach a small reading group each morning and am always amazed at how productive and meaningful working with small groups can be as a teacher.

      Delete
  3. Hello!
    We also use LLI at my school. It is a great way to work with a small group of students and focus intensely on their specific needs. My biggest struggle has been finding the best way to assess the students to see if they are making progress. Currently, I monitor the students' progress through the assessments that come with the odd lessons (I think it's the odd lessons. It's Christmas break, so my mind is not in LLI mode!) These assessments are time consuming (one on one - teacher to student - 10+ minutes) so I lose a lot of teaching time. So, I can only assess each student once every few weeks. I don't like this! What do you use? Do you have any quick check assessments? I've looked everywhere. Any suggestions are welcome!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi! I use the same reading record assessments that you do and find them very informative. I do agree that they definitely take time, and you are only able to progress monitor each student once every few weeks. At my school, we use anecdotal/formative data like this, along with progress monitoring data from a bi-weekly computerized assessment. I find that between the two data points, along with my observations, I'm usually able to get a pretty clear view of the student as a reader.

      Delete
  4. I've spent the last two days at school unpacking my LLI kit and I'm so excited it use it. I did a similar system but using magazine folders in a cabinet instead of file folders in a filing cabinet. I like the idea of keeping a master copy with each lesson/set of books.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is awesome. You will love it! Keeping the master copy with each lesson is a huge time saver, along with printing out the online resources with each lesson and keeping those in the folders, too.

      Delete
  5. This is a great way to organize LLi materials. I am going to implement this process at my school. I was wondering how many file cabinets you needed for the Red and Gold kits? I currently have all the kits and I am trying to see how many cabinets I will need to order.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love using the file cabinets to house the LLI materials. It really helps make the materials accessible to all staff using them. Our rule of thumb is two, tall 4-drawer file cabinets per system. You may have one extra drawer with using this, but that would be what I would say approximately. Good luck to you! :)

      Delete
  6. I just learned about LLI in a very short PD, I am very interested. I now teach middle school CI students, the reading levels range from 1st to 7th grade. I have very little experience with teaching students to read and thought this might be a great program for them? How did you start? Did your district just purchase the program or is there a sample pack out there to try before I go to my Supervisor?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know that Heinnemann has sample packs available so that you can see what the books and lessons are like. My district had us participate in several professional development opportunities to get trained in how to best utilize the intervention system, and we have slowly purchased more systems as more have become available.

      Delete
  7. Did you have to keep grades for LLI? I'm looking for a possible grading policy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Rachel,

      No, we don't keep grades for LLI as we use it as a reading intervention and just have to give a pass/fail. However, if I did have to keep grades, I think I would look at it similar to how I grade guided reading and assess within, beyond, and about the text comprehension for nonfiction books, grade the writing about reading, and possibly give "exit slip" questions to assess if students are taking on the word study concepts. That's just my two cents! :) Good luck to you. It is definitely a hard thing to grade as so much of what you would grade would be formative assessments to help you inform future instruction.

      Delete
  8. I recently put the program in several file cabinets. I took apart the teacher manuals and placed each lesson in the folder with the books. Is there a copy of each lesson somewhere online?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Karla,

      The LLI systems come with online software, so if you register your system by following the directions inside your software, you can access the online resources. The actual lessons are not printable online, but all of the handouts that go with each lesson are online.

      Delete
  9. Hi Kasey,
    I'm a bit confused. If a student is assessed at Level L , for example, I would begin working with him at that level in the Red system. But after the student completes all the Red books (L-Q) and moves up to Gold, he backtracks to Level O again?
    My school is planning to purchase this system next year.
    Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi!

      That is a great question. You don't have to backtrack levels once you move from one system to another. You can hop right into the new system at the student's current benchmark level. The overlapping is nice when you have students that get stuck at the same level for a long time. It's also great to have both systems to be able to use the Red system with younger grade levels and the Gold with higher grade levels as even though the books are the same levels, the higher systems contain books with more mature themes as they go up.

      Delete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...